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Deepika Padukone and Sonam Kapoor stood up for themselves and for all of us with their open letters!

Nothing is more touching than when the celebrities put their heart out and open up about something that happened to them in the past in order to support and advocate the rest of the people. Letting them know that they are not alone and so many celebrities have done this especially in Bollywood. Celebrities like Sonam Kapoor and Deepika Padukone came out strong and talked about the issues that people, most ladies, were struggling with.
Here are the most inspirational open letters of them.

Deepika Padukone

"There is only ONE sign that a woman wants to have s** and that is that she says "YES".
The reason I write the above line is because we all know that in India we are so desperately trying to make a change in the way sections of our society think in order to move towards a happier world devoid of inequality, ra**, fear, and pain. I am not naive about my own profession; it is one that requires lots of demanding things of me. A character may demand that I be clothed from head to toe or be completely naked, and it will be my choice as an actor whether or not I take either. Understand that this is a ROLE and not REAL, and it is my job to portray whatever character I choose to play convincingly.

Read the rest of her open letter on NEXT page!

What my concern is and I am stating it clearly so it is not misconstrued or confused with Shahrukh's 8-pack or any other woman's or man's anatomy. I have spoken out against an ideology that such regressive tactics are still being employed to draw a reader's attention at a time when we are striving for women's equality and empowerment. In a time where women should be applauded for making headway in a male-dominated society, we blur the lines between REEL and REAL life and dilute all our efforts by making a one-year-old back sliding piece of news a headline.

Digging out an old article and headlining it "OMG: Deepika's Cleavage Show!" to attract readers is using the power of influence to proliferate recessive thought. When an actresses inner wear decides to do a "peek-a-boo, she most definitely did not step out with the intention to do so. So instead of zooming in, circling it and pointing arrows at it, why don't we give her some 'respect' and let it go instead of making it 'headlines'!? Are we not human? Yes, we marvel, envy and drool over male actors 8pack abs in a film, but do we zoom in on the mans 'crotch' when he makes a public appearance and make that 'cheap headlines'??!!

Go to the NEXT page to see how Deepika supported all women!

I have no issue celebrating my body and I have never shied away from anything on-screen to portray a character. In fact, my next character portrayed is a bar dancer (sorry Farah for the spoiler!) who titillates men as a means to support her livelihood. My issue is you propagating the objectification of a REAL person, and not a character being played. Sure, dissect my characters if you wish-if it is of so much interest then discuss the character's cup size and leg length if it is relevant to making the role convincing. All I am asking for is respect as a woman off-screen.

It is a matter of context and how out-of-context the reportage is just to sell a headline. And more so during a time in dire need of an attitude shift towards women. For me, this topic ends here. Everyone is entitled to an opinion.I have little interest to take this further as it might get more attention than it deserves and might be further misconstrued and twisted to sell more undeserved headlines. Having said that, please may we show love, dignity, and respect to each other. Live well, laugh often and love much."
WOW! She got us in tears!

Find Sonam Kapoor's open letter on NEXT page!

Sonam Kapoor

"People started calling me flat-chested. I'd never been insecure about my C-cup but I got defensive about it on Koffee With Karan. Eventually, I didn't even need the tabloids to point out my flaws – I could look at myself on camera monitors and predict what would be criticised. I still remember the frames I hated immediately: the tight silver dress from Bewakoofiyaan, the song with Neil Nitin in Players, the swimsuit and shorts in Aisha, to name a few. Of course, scrutiny of female bodies isn't new, or even restricted to celebrities. I mean, raise your hand if you've ever been called "healthy" by a relative, or been given unsolicited advice by a friend about how to lose weight.

Raise your hand if you were told to stay out of the sun so you don't get dark. Raise your hand if you started hating your body after somebody else told you how. Here's what's gone wrong: We've been taught that women need to be flawless even when our flawlessness is wildly implausible, s**y even when our s**iness is a break from plot. We're sprinting through Jurassic Park in heels, fighting super villains in strapless corsets, being stranded on deserted islands for days without a hint of stubble. Real female bodies are so taboo that hair-removal-cream ads show hairless legs even before the cream is applied.

The rest of Sonam's open letter can be found on NEXT page!

The rules of beauty are strict and it's almost impossible to win. Anushka Sharma has been skinny-shamed, Sonakshi Sinha has been fat-shamed, Katrina Kaif has been fit-shamed. These are women who are and always have been staggeringly beautiful. But where there's a broken system, there's a solution. The problem is in mainstream culture's rigid definitions of female beauty. The solution, for me, has been in the women I know. It's been a decade since I entered the film industry with my awful self-esteem in tow and, thanks to the female support I've had throughout, that self-esteem is in a healthier place now. I'm lucky to have had my friend and makeup artist Namrata Soni, who sees my face from hyper close quarters and goes out of her way to make me feel good about it.

When I whine about my laugh lines or dark circles, she tells me they're natural and that's why they're beautiful. I have a forcep scar on the right side of my face and my lip lifts up on one side. When I float the idea of getting them fixed, Namrata reminds me that they make me me. Instead of letting me interpret my body's quirks and changes as "flaws", Namrata helps me celebrate them as unique markers of unique beauty. I'm lucky to have had my sister and sometimes stylist Rhea, the hottest girl I know. When I'm beating myself up for being too lanky, for not having her curves, she shuts me down and insists I look good in everything she makes me wear. When I start complaining that I don't look like I did when I was 21, Rhea tells me I look better now..."
Now it is time to play “scars to your beautiful” and celebrate our flaws!

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