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Alzheimer's At 40! What Are The Symptoms Of The Cruel, Incurable Disease?

Stages of the disease

Due to the incurable and debilitating nature of Alzheimer's, those who struggle with it require help from those around them. The role of primary caregiver usually includes a spouse or close relative. The stages of Alzheimer's disease provide a general idea of how a patient's abilities change after the onset of symptoms. The stages are divided into three categories: mild, moderate, and severe/advanced stages. And we'll briefly explain them. In the early stage, the person can function independently. He or she can continue to lead his or her current life; drive, work and participate in social life. Nevertheless, patients have the impression that they have memory loss. Symptoms are not very visible at this stage, but family and loved ones may notice them. Mood swings and personality problems may occur, among other things, and there may be some or a whole host of depressive symptoms. Eventually, independent functioning becomes increasingly difficult. In the middle stage of the disease, in addition to memory problems, speech and orientation are increasingly impaired, and psychotic symptoms also appear. Patients, for example, don't recognize places they are familiar with and often have trouble finding their way home. Progressive disorders even lead to problems recognizing loved ones. It may also lead to hallucinations and delusions. At this stage of the disease, it is necessary to take care of the patient. In the final stage, the symptoms of dementia are very severe. Patients lose the ability to respond to their surroundings, hold conversations, and eventually control movement. At this stage, they require constant care and assistance with daily activities such as grooming, dressing, and washing. They experience problems walking, sitting, and even swallowing meals. Eventually, it gets to the point where patients don't get out of bed, have trouble holding their urine and bowel movements. There is a complete lack of recognition of loved ones and even the times of day and night. Gradually, vital functions are lost, leading to death.

Stages of the disease

Symptoms

Although the progression of the disease in its advanced stages is very distressing, the beginnings of Alzheimer's are uncharacteristic and easily overlooked. Memory problems, while initially minor, are usually one of the first symptoms associated with Alzheimer's disease. The Alzheimer's Association of America has created a list of the 10 most common symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Briefly, these are memory loss that disrupts daily life, challenges in planning or problem solving, difficulty performing familiar tasks, confusion with a sense of time or feeling disoriented, problems understanding visual images and spatial relationships, previously non-existent problems with spoken or written words, losing/placing things in the wrong places and losing the ability to retrace steps, experiencing changes in judgment or decision making, and changes in mood and personality. Of course, the symptoms listed, called warning signs, have their own development and described broader explanations. But if you notice at least 2 of the 10 in yourself or a loved one, don't ignore them. It is then worth making an appointment to see a doctor for a more in-depth diagnosis.

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